Monday, September 30, 2013

Week #4: Examining bias and perspective. Choose any story to blog about this week. Examine the following: What perspective is the story written from? What perspective(s) are missing in the story? What might these people say about the issue? (Due Oct. 2)

34 comments:

  1. New York Times, September 30, "Qaeda Plot Leak Has Undermined U.S. Intelligence" by Eric Schmitt and Michael S. Schmidt.

    Summary: The U.S. has been tracking communication between Al Qaeda leaders to help with counterterrorism efforts. Apparently this has hindered just as much as helped. The Al Qaeda leaders are watching the media so they know when their information has leaked so they stop using those mediums. There has been a significant drop in detected communication since the leak and it has U.S. intelligence worried.

    Connection to Social Studies: This is showing interaction between the U.S. and the rest of the world. This is saying that it is important for the U.S. to be able to have a certain level of control over suspicious parties. It is up to us to decide the value of this.

    Applications: Student will have to draft their own opinion on what is appropriate and what is not when it comes to dealing with other countries. At what level should we respect the privacy of others? What are reasons why we might want to keep track of others' actions? How much of government actions should be made public? This can open up discussion on controversial topics.

    What perspectives is the story written from? What perspectives are missing from the story? What might these people say about the issue?: This is definitely written from the perspective of the government. It talks about how they see things and backs their actions. We are missing the perspective of anyone opposed to the government's actions and the perspective of ordinary citizens. This was a hard article to read and I think if they had written from the perspective of a U.S. citizen, it would have been more understandable. They would have talked about how the leak affected us personally. I think someone from a different country would have been uncomfortable with this issue because the U.S. could be spying on them. This would not be seen as favorable.

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    1. I found the answer to the weekly question interesting! I never realized this before, but I agree with you that often when articles are written from a government or institution perspective, they are more difficult to read than if they were from a viewpoint of citizens or "every-day people." More people would understand what was going on if they were written in a more user-friendly way. Interesting perspectives.

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    2. I also agree with Cami; if articles written from government perspective were easier for everyone to read, then we would hear more from the people. As it is, people don't think some events are applicable because it can take a lot of time to figure out what's going on. Also, if people are intimidated by an article, it is unlikely they will do further research to form an educated opinion, because their attention and interest has not been captured.

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  2. Post #4: Examining Bias and perspective
    New York Times
    Thursday, September 26, 2013
    Swimmer is Fighting a Ruling: She is not Disabled enough.
    By Sarah L Yall


    Article Summary:
    This article is the story of a 19-year-old Paralympics swimmer who was sent home from the Paralympics this year for “[failing] to provide conclusive evidence of a permanent eligible impairment.” She spent 3 years in and out of a coma, and has back pain, hand and arm spasms, and leg paralysis. The Paralympics committee basically said that since there is a chance that she could walk again, she is not eligible to compete in the Paralympics, even though she had competed years previously.


    Social Studies Connections:
    This article deals with the NCSS themes of Individual Development and Identity and Individuals, Groups and Institutions because it focuses on the relationships between the swimmer and her disability and the swimmer and the Paralympics committee (institution).

    Application/ Objectives:

    I thought this might be an interesting article to read as an introduction to perspective. The article does share two sides of the story; however, it has bias that sways the reader to one side even from the title. I think it would be good for students to read and study this article and identify the elements of bias. It would also be interesting to read another article (and hopefully find one that is either from the committee or swayed towards the committees view) and compare the two articles to get the facts so the students can form their own opinions.


    Response to weekly question: Examining Bias and Perspective
    The article shared points from both the Paralympics committee and the swimmer (and her side). I thought however, that it was more from the perspective of the swimmer and her side of the story—and presented a negative bias toward the Paralympics committee. I think most people would take her side because of how the other side was presented. The title and the author’s use of phrase “not disabled enough” puts a horrible taste in the mouth of the reader in regards to the committee even before they read the article. I found myself feeling sorry for her and disliking the Paralympics committee, even though I didn’t really get a very good look at their side. I found myself wondering at the end of the article, “OK, so I know her side, and I know a little about the Paralympics committee’s opinion and why they did it; but I still don’t get it.” This shows that the article was swayed to the swimmer’s side. I think the committee might give a better explanation of why they disqualified her and what evidence they had to do so.
    I also think the article lacked a third viewpoint; the opinion of other Paralympics swimmers. I think the other swimmers are an important piece of this story because these are her competitors and I would like to know their side. I think her competitors would probably be on both sides, some saying she should still be able to compete, and others agreeing with the committee. Even though their opinions may be split, I would have liked to hear from her competitors to get a better idea of the story.

    Blog Author: Cami Hall

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    1. I think it's interesting how complicated some issues can get. Every issue has a different perspective and opinion. But some sides are shown more than others. I like how honest you reviewed this article. The title definitely put a horrible taste in my mouth! While I do agree that it would be better to get other people's perspectives to make a clearer picture, it makes me wonder- would newspaper articles be as interesting if sides WEREN'T taken? On the other hand, are we, as readers, losing our ability to decide for ourselves? I think I am not as good at objectively reading articles and making my own opinions. Sometimes, I just read and take it in.

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    2. I love how you pointed out that the Paralympics committee's opinion is the one being left out. I think that it is easy for the newspaper to take the side of the citizen and make it look like they are being suppressed by a big institution. The newspaper is able to hook more people's attention that way. I think it is eye catching to see that someone is being discriminated against (it was for me) and I think it would be really interesting to hear the whole story from the committee's point of view.

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  3. The New York Times, Thursday, September 26, 2013
    “Tourism initiatives give village new lease on life” by Huang Yiming and Li Fusheng

    Summary of Article:
    Haikou residents are benefiting from a local eco-village campaign that started in 2007. Houses have been improved, crops are diversified, and the clean and beautiful village now attracts visitors. Interviewed residents said they are content with their life. The village is now lively and drawing people in from around the world.

    Connect to Social Studies:
    Several Social Studies standards are addressed in this article. Culture constantly changes. These residents are learning how to adapt to a new culture of visitors and tourism. People, Places and Environments- these residents are interacting with their beautiful surroundings and people to create a memorable experience. Haikou’s residents are also creating Global Connections. World trade and tourism is growing in their town.

    Classroom Application:
    I want my students to know they can have their opinions heard. No matter what topic, or discussion, everyone has valid input. Then, as a whole group, we would decide what would be best for all of us. To help students understand how important people’s opinions are, I would have them read newspaper articles and find whose voice was heard and whose wasn’t.

    Weekly Question—what perspective is the story written from? What perspective(s) are missing in the story? What might these people say about the issue?
    This article was a very positive perspective on what is happening in Haikou. The eco-village campaign is credited with all the village improvements. Interviewed residents discuss how much more money they make at their jobs and how happy the village is. While it is nice to hear about a positive change, I wonder who doesn’t like these changes. With every change, particularly in society, there are different opinions. Who doesn’t like all the people coming into their village? Who wants to keep old traditions? I think it would be interesting to hear other people’s opinions, even if they are the minority.

    Holly Johnson

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    1. Holly,
      You really hit the nail on the head! Although some members of the community seem to be pleased with the tourism dollars, it would be difficult to believe that everyone is pleased with the changes. It would be nice to hear other sides of the story or at least a few of the challenges along with the benefits.

      When we live and work in groups, it's important to at least acknowledge differing perspectives, even when we don't agree with them. For example, today in class, I wanted to make sure that a perspective of some women in the Church who want to hold the priesthood was mentioned (i.e. that the priesthood will eventually be given to women, just as the priesthood was extended to all worthy males). Then, we were able to discuss what we believed about that perspective. Open dialog goes a long way in fostering understanding and allowing all points of view to be heard.

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  4. The New York Times, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013
    How Do You Say ‘Blog’ in German? By Anna Sauerbrey

    Summary
    The German language has been increasingly borrowing more and more English words, especially “…as technology creates its own new words and facilitates the global spread of newfangled cultural terminology.” Recently the editors of the Duden dictionary, the German equivalent of the Oxford English Dictionary, added 5,000 new words to the latest edition. Many of the new words are English or of English origin, including “digital native” and “flashmob.” Members of the German Language Society, an unofficial organization, voted the Duden editors the “language adulterers of the year.” The author asserts: “Most Germans are more liberal in their linguistic views and generally agree that the idea of protecting a country’s language is as megalomaniacal [having fantasies of power, relevance, or omnipotence] as it is futile.”

    Connections to Social Studies
    Time, Continuity, and Change—Historically, foreign words have been passed among many countries. Looking back across time, the historical experiences of how societies’ languages have affected cultures, values, ideals, and traditions give students of social studies opportunities to study the past and its legacy to them.

    Individuals, Groups, and Institutions—It is important that students know how institutions control and influence them. Students could ask what influence an organization like the German Language Society or writers of opinion articles might have on the adoption of foreign words and how those words and the cultures from which they originated are perceived in society.

    Science, Technology, and Society—In this instance, technology has had a major influence on social and cultural change. According to the author of the article, most Germans are liberal in their linguistic views and have a relaxed relationship with both German and English. However, this “…stance has nevertheless touched a chord across German society, particularly among people you might call anti-cosmopolitans: those who feel unable to keep up with an internationalization they feel is being imposed on them.”

    Global Connections—The costs and benefits of increased global connections through techno-linguistic transfers could be debated.

    This article could be tied to Grade 4, Standard II: Students will understand how Utah’s history has been shaped by many diverse people, events, and ideas. Objective 1: Describe the historical and current impact of various cultural groups on Utah. Indicator e: Explain the importance of preserving cultural prehistory and history, including archaeological sites and other historic sites and artifacts.

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    1. Continued...
      Response to “What perspective is the story written from? What perspective(s) are missing in the story? What might these people say about the issue?
      I find it interesting that the author of the article calls members of German society in favor of preserving the German language “megalomaniacal.” I had to look up the definition of the word to grasp her meaning! Certainly, she doesn’t seek to understand the perspectives of members of that group. She blames their attitudes on the rapid homogenization of Europe and their feeling of speaking a marginalized language, even in countries like France and Germany where there are large populations of native speakers. She also defines their refusal to accept internationalization of the German language as a refusal to accept internationalization as a phenomenon, and she calls it “…a nativist attempt to stand up to globalization.”

      On the other hand, a perspective missing from this article is the need to preserve linguistic traditions that have endured thousands of years. The author has neglected to show respect toward the value of a language used brilliantly by great German philosophers like Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche and other writers and speakers of the language.

      The author of this article admits that there is a “feeling of speaking marginalized languages,” but she doesn’t address why there might be a fear associated with that feeling. She chooses not to recognize that many members of diverse societies lament the loss of traditional languages that are no longer in use and have disappeared, thus forcing us to lose access to history and historical perspectives that could influence what we choose to do or not do today.

      The core standard mentioned above highlights the importance of preserving cultural prehistory and history. Some people might feel it’s important to preserve the cultural history of German-speaking countries by preserving the German language.

      Application
      Students of social studies could analyze the causes and consequences of foreign words being adopted into the English language. There may be benefits and detrimental results associated with the additions that could be delineated, discussed, and evaluated.

      Submitted by Joyce Mustoe

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  5. The New York Times, Tuesday October 1, 2013
    "U.S. Reckons with Impact of Shutdown" by Michael D. Shear

    Summary of Article:
    This article is about the recent "shutdown" of all federal things. Because the government couldn't decide on a budget, they were unauthorized to spend anything and so everything run by government money had to be shut down. And all federal employees didn't go to work. A lot of tourist attractions and other things were shut down.

    Connect to Social Studies: I think this article ties in with science, technology, and society. This shutdown really shows the impact of when government websites and technology are shut down. We really rely on a lot of those things. I also think this ties in with governance, power, and authority because this shut down shows how much we really need our government. It shows what life is like if we don't have government.

    Classroom Application:
    I think this would be a great news story to share with my classroom. It would be a great way to teach about the government and what things would be like without a government. It would also be a great way to teach about public and private businesses because many of the public things were shut down. Students could have a debate about whether more government is better or less government is better.

    Weekly Question:
    This seems to be from the perspective of the people who were affected by the shutdown. The quotes and interviews were mostly people who came to visit but couldn't see a tourist attraction they wanted to. Or they were from somebody who didn't go to work that day because they were a federal employee. It would have been interesting to see the perspective of the government and those who made this decision to shut things down and why they made that decision. It would also have been good to see the perspective of the republicans who were protesting and sort of caused the government to make this decision. They might be able to tell us why they were protesting and what they think of their decision to shut things down.

    Lana Poppleton

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    1. Thank you for doing this article, my father was affected and so I felt a little too heated to write a respectable article, but I thought it needed to be mentioned. I would also like to hear the opinion of our government and see what they are thinking??

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    2. I think this article demonstrates how dependent we have become on the national government. Maybe it also shows how important it is that we become as self-reliant as we possibly can.

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  6. Wall Street Journal, October 1, 2013
    "AT&T's Ultrafast Internet to Rival Google's; Carrier to Offer Service in Austin, Texas by Middle of Next Year" by Thomas Gryta

    Summary
    Google is starting to offer fast internet to select cities, Austin, Texas, being one of them. In addition to Google, AT&T is starting to rollout it's own fast internet, and will closely follow Google in Austin, targeting promising areas and neighborhoods. Though technology could rapidly progress in these communities, it could also be at a standstill for those communities who cannot afford these faster internet options, leaving them behind.

    Connection to Social Studies
    Our world is becoming smaller every day, especially through the internet, and I can't even imagine how rapidly that will increase as the internet becomes even faster. This happening also sheds light on the divide of the economic statuses of neighborhoods, which isn't the first thing people think of when they hear that faster wifi is being developed.

    Applications
    I think this would be good to use so that students can find out different perspectives about an upcoming event. Most of us have heard about Google Fiber, but I doubt many have thought about the effects on people who are unable to get it because their neighborhood is not promising enough. Students can read a variety of articles about a topic and recognize that different groups of people have different concerns, most of which they hadn't thought of.

    Question: Examining Bias and Perspective
    At first, it seems like the writer is unbiased and just reporting on an event, but what caught my attention is their concern about those who will have the faster internet available to them. It is very unlikely that the people in the companies or the selected neighborhoods have thought about this or the impacts that it will have on those people. I think if more people had this viewpoint or were aware of potential implications, there would be more talk, but as it is now, those who are in the chosen communities are just excited about faster internet access.

    Holly Meek

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  7. Thanks for sharing this! That is true. I never thought about how faster internet could affect places that can't afford to have it!

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  8. New York Times
    Wednesday, October 2, 2013
    A Committed Group of Conservatives Outflanks the House Leadership
    By Jonathan Weisman and Ashley Parker

    Summary:
    This article points out a group of conservatives that are against the health care law and blames them for the government shutdown. It discusses the frustration of other members of congress with these Republicans.

    Connection to Social Studies:
    This article definitely relates to the NCSS theme of power, authority, and governance. This article talks about the making of laws in our country as well as the interactions between the elected officials that sometimes make decision making difficult.

    Application:
    I think this would be a great article to discuss with children in 5th grade about how hard it really is to pass a law today. This could be tied in really nicely with the making of the constitution and the compromises that had to be made for that document to be created.
    5th grade Social Studies Standard 3:Students will understand the rights and responsibilities guaranteed in the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights.
    Objective 1: Assess the underlying principles of the US Constitution as the framework for the United States’ form of government, a compound constitutional republic.
    a)Explain the process of passing a law.

    Prompt: What perspective is the story written from? What perspectives are missing in the story? What might these people say about the issue?
    It seems like everyone is pointing fingers this week and the New York Times is pointing their finger at Republicans. This is to be expected since the New York Times always has a more liberal bias to their stories. The importance of perspective is really highlighted in political articles because the political parties in the United States have such strong negative opinions about the opposite party. Often, the parties have more extreme positions than the people and it makes it hard for congress to compromise. I'm sure the opinion of Republicans on this issue is that they think the government shutdown is the President's fault for making the health care law without their support. Both sides are rigid in their opinion and will have a hard time seeing each other's perspectives. Another perspective that this story does not cover is the opinion of the everyday citizen that is frustrated with a government that tries to assign blame rather than fix the problem. Many people think that the parties should just settle their differences and get the government back on line. Another perspective that is often left out of political articles is the perspective of the "other" parties like the green party and the libertarians. I do not know what they would say about this subject but I'm sure they have a unique opinion as well.

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    1. I think that this article is a perfect opportunity to teach students about our government. I also think that this article would be a good article to use to show the students the polarization of our country at times. I think that there are definite biases all around the country on this issue. This is an interesting article and I wonder if politics is one issue that will always have biases in articles, no matter which party you do or do not support.

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  9. The New York Times
    A Monument to the West That Many Pass By
    October 1, 2013

    Summary
    In short, “Money Troubles Threaten to Make a Tribute To Pioneers a Mammoth Eyesore” is the summary of my article. But in more detail, the article discusses a monument in Kearns NE that was built to bring a lot of money into the area and is now broke. The Monument was described once as “This monument has the potential to be a national shrine” and now is described as “the black eye that everybody would notice as the go through the state”(if the monument were to close).

    Connection to Social Studies
    The connection to Social Studies is the lack of appreciation for our history. This monument was built to honor the spot where the mormons’, 49ers and Oregon trail pioneers converged. It also brings up the idea of passing time and economy in the US. US citizens don’t have as much money to travel now and their interest is in fast pace media, not monuments.

    Classroom Application
    In my classroom we would talk about how times are changing in our country. The priorities that people have now compared to before. And then we could even talk about the 3 trails and how they converged, where they were, who went through there. It would be a great lesson supplement to start talking about the pioneers and our nations explorers.

    Weekly question: Examining bias and perspective
    This article has the perspective of a newspaper writer, it does not seem to have a bias. To me, all perspectives are given, there is a quote from the mayor, from a tourist, and from the builders. I’m not sure there is an essential perspective that is missing in this article, the only one I could think to add is of a local or a monument worker who has a day to day relationship with the place and see how they feel about the monument's possible closing. To them, this monument might be more than just a monument.

    Jessica Fox

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    2. Jessica, I really appreciated how you discussed that the world is changing as we continue to get more and more fast-paced. Sadly, this does mean that history (and historical sites) have begun to go out the window. You stated that "US citizens don’t have as much money to travel now and their interest is in fast pace media, not monuments". I agree with you completely! Those citizens that have the money to visit monuments such as this one are most likely not the types of people that have interest in visiting them, and those that might be interested in coming don't have sufficient funds. I guess it just brings up the idea that no matter where we live, we need to appreciate the national monuments and beautiful geography in which we live, trying to visit as often as possible. I mean, I live less than an hour-drive away from a few national monuments, but I haven't ever gone to visit them. Or, drive a little further and you've got Zion and the Arches! It's sad that even though I live so close to these historic places, I have either never been or it's been a very long time.

      Thanks for sharing your perspective on this article, Jessica.

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    3. Hey! Thanks for your response, it was an interesting article. It's sad to me that people don't value historical sites like they used to. That's sad that the monument is thought of as a "black eye" even to the people of the community. Like Heather said, it's important for us to appreciate and visit the history around us! We should all feel some sort of responsibility to preserving the historical place around us.

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  10. Wall Street Journal
    Why Tough Teachers Get Good Results
    By JOANNE LIPMAN
    September 27, 2013

    Summary
    This article discusses the success of music teacher Mr. K, a Ukranian immigrated orchestra conductor who passed away just a few years ago. The author, one of his previous students, writes about how Mr. K tended to be on the strict side when it came to classroom management. This strictness, the author mentions, would most likely get Mr. K fired in our schools today. But, the author goes on to explain that in some cases, stricter is better; she addresses the many benefits that come from teaching in a similar style as Mr. K and even adds her own personal touch and opinion to this style of teaching. I recommend reading through the entire article to see just how Mr. K was able to instill in his students the characteristics of discipline, self-motivation, and resilience.

    Connections to Social Studies
    Education has always been a hot topic because there are so many ways to address the teaching of children. But, because this article comes in the shadow of the “Common Core Uproar”, I find it a bit refreshing. The article discusses those “traditional or old-school” teachers, with their strict procedures and what seem to be “harsh” consequences from our perspective, were actually quite successful in instilling students with self-motivation, resilience and discipline, characteristics that are often lacking in todays’ schools. So, it is important that as future teachers (and we’re really close to being teachers) we recognize that even though the Common Core Curriculum pushes us one way, we may need to implement other teaching strategies from the past to help our students truly be prepared to participate and succeed in the world in which they live.

    Classroom Application
    I would tend to use this article to discuss how different people have different preferences when it comes to teaching and learning. I might even have the students look at their own classroom with a critical eye and write down what things they like and what things might need some changes. As a teacher, I could then address those things the students suggested as things in need of change, making sure that our entire classroom attitude and mood is always working towards positive reinforcement, while also including constructive feedback to help the students progress in their learning.

    Weekly Question: What perspective is the story written from? What perspective(s) are missing in the story? What might these people say about the issue?
    Obviously, because this is a personal story and application, this article is only written from the perspective of Joanne Lipman, one student of Mr. K’s. But, the author also includes a few quotes from other students, as well some scientific studies in order to strengthen her argument. Overall, the story reflects on how tough teachers get good results in the classroom setting and really only addresses this one side. So, if the opposition were able to have a voice in this article, they would most likely state that tough teachers kill off creativity and disregard personal sentiments and emotions. The article addresses a biased look at these issues, but overall it’s a great look into one side of teaching.

    My favorite quote from the entire article: “There is something to be said about a teacher who is demanding and tough not because he thinks students will never learn but because he is so absolutely certain that they will.”

    --Heather Young

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    1. I really like how you mentioned that “different people have different perspectives when it comes to teaching and learning”. As there is not one right way to teach or to learn, it’s important to incorporate a variety of methods in order to best meet students’ needs. There are currently and have been excellent teaching strategies, and it’s important to consider various approaches as we strive to help each child learn. I completely agree that having students report what they like as well as possible changes is a great way to better understand our students and adjust instruction.

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    2. I like how you picked an article that really relates to our profession. It would be interesting to the students too, especially in the upper grades. Too often we forget to teach about how to learn and how to teach. The students need to understand why we do what we do.

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  11. New York Times
    September 29, 1013
    Apple passes Coca Cola as most valuable brand
    By Stuart Elliot

    Summary: This article was about a company called Interbrand who picks the best Global Brands every year. Coca Cola has been number 1 on the list for 13 years but finally was passed by apple this year who is the new number one. They reported that apple has changed life not only with its products, but with its ethos. Google is now number 2 on the list and Coca Cola is number 2.

    Connections to Social Studies:
    This goes along with the NCSS standard of buying and selling goods. Apple has been found to be a valuable product that a lot of people can't live without. Besides it being a product for consumers, it has also become a tools for discourse which relates to social studies.

    Classroom Applications:
    I would use this to teach students about products and consumers. I might even have them come up with their own products by thinking of a need and a product that might feel the need. I might have them advertise their product to the class as part of a project.

    Weekly Question:
    This was written from the perspective of someone who was at the conference where they announced the most valuable brands. I think all perspectives were fairly represented. They had of course people from apple talking about their excitement and they also had some quotes from coca cola people who took the loss pretty well. I didn't feel like the article had any biases one way or the other, just reporting on the news.

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    1. This seems like it was an interesting article! It seems like Apple is taking over the world-- I think discussing business in the classroom would be really educational! I remember liking the activities I did as a young student where I had to design and create my own product. It kept me thinking and I was engaged, so I'm sure your students would be too!

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  12. Wall Street Journal
    "Rising Home Costs Pull Up Rents, Too"
    By Dawn Wotapka

    Summary:
    The prices of rent are rising all over the country, with the average rent price in the last five years increasing 7.6%. Many big cities, like New York, San Fransisco, and Boston have seen big rent increases, but some expect it to go back down eventually due to new units being built. A theory for the higher rent is that more young people are renting instead of buying, so there is a higher demand for rented space.

    Connections to Social Studies:
    This relates to social studies because it relates to people and where they live! In younger grades, you could discuss all the different kinds of places that people live (even if children come from poor families), such as apartment, trailer, house, basement, condo, etc.

    Classroom Applications:
    Talking about this article can lead into a discussion of what it means to rent or buy property. It could also potentially start a discussion of why certain cities/locations have higher rent than others, leading into a discussion about the value of land.

    Weekly Question:
    The story seems to be written strictly from a factual source. There are no quotes or interviews from people who actually noticed a change in rent. I think it would be interesting to make mention of which cities people actually noticed a change in their rent price.

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  13. Defining and Demanding a Musician’s Fair Shake in the Internet Age
    The New York Times
    October 1, 2013
    By Ben Sisario

    Article Summary:
    Musicians and artists have been having problems with piracy, copyright infringement and this has caused their pay to decrease. This has caused one musician to speak out against internet piracy and for musicians’ salary. This artist is David Lowery and he does not want to see the artists’ royalties continue to decrease.

    Social Studies Connection:
    This article relates to the social studies core in that it relates to goods and services as well as our rights as citizens. In fourth grade, students should learn economic principles. These include the relationship between supply and demand, goods and services and producers and consumers. This article could be used to show that music is a service. This article could also be used in the fifth grade curriculum in speaking about the Bill of Rights. As a class, we could discuss whether musicians have the right to demand more for royalties and if we as consumers have the right to use the music for free.

    Application:
    I would use this article to ask the student what a definition of a service is. I would also ask if music is a service. I would then have them look at the article and discover that people are trying to figure out what the cost should be for this service. This could be part of a debate of what is a service and if the consumers and producers need to have agreements on how this exchange should work. I would also use this article to show that we all have rights and discuss what those rights are. I would also ask the class to discuss the musicians’ rights to their music and what those rights are.

    Examining Bias and Perspective:
    This article was written from the perspective of the musicians and artist who are not making as much money as they once did. The perspective focuses on the musicians and gives bias to how internet and lack of bigger royalties on the internet is difficult in making money in music. The perspective that was missing from the article was the perspectives of the companies that play the artists songs such as Pandora and Spotify. Also, it does not go into the perspectives of the producers and corporations that often copyright songs for the artists. There are many different perspectives to this story and only the artist perfective was really developed. Piracy and internet usage of music has become a big issue in the more technology savvy age. Some people believe that it is their right to use a song once they have bought it, and some artists believe that they should receive royalties every time someone plays it. This is a sensitive issue that affects many people and each side of the argument there are very strong feelings. This article could be written in many different ways with different biases.

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  14. The New York Times
    End of an Aimless Summer: 3 Youths Charged in a Killing
    October 1, 2013

    Summary
    This article articulates the murder of a college student by a few young men who confessed to committing the act out of boredom. The article talks about who the college student was, who the three youth were, and what the town where they live is like.

    Connection to Social Studies
    This relates to social studies because it explains how the community factors influenced the actions of the young men. It also talked about their families and how broken families often lead teenagers to consume drugs and get into trouble.

    Classroom Application
    I don’t know that I would share this in an elementary school classroom. It seems like it would be more for junior high school or high school. But, looking at this article I can see why it is important to teach students about the community. It is also important to teach them that there are consequences to their actions. Most of the teenagers were not doing well in school. It is important to teach the students why it is beneficial to be involved in school and community.

    Weekly question: Examining bias and perspective
    The story is written from the perspective of an outsider that interviewed many people that were involved in the incident. The writer interviewed family members of the charged youth and the people that were close to the victim. The writer also explained the culture of the community and quoted a few government officials. The perspectives that are missing are those of the shooters. They may have more reasons as to why they acted the way they did and how their lives up to this point did not help them to be better people.

    Blog Author: Kelsey Captain

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    Replies
    1. That's a scary article! But a real thing that we see happen. I feel like as teachers we have the responsibility and many opportunities to help guide children to understanding how our decisions affects our lives and our happiness.

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  15. The Universe
    Ditching Kashmir and cricket to become friends
    By Taylor Hintz
    Sept. 30, 2013

    Summary
    This article tells how two girls at BYU become friends despite their each of their country's 60 year history of not getting along with each other. Katuka from India and Aslam from Pakistan met in a BYU religion class and have grown to be good friends. Even though they do have differences from how they grew up and what they believe, they have many similarities which has brought them together.

    Connection to Social Studies:
    This examines the differences that exist between people and cultures. It is a personal example of how two students become friends regardless of their country's known history for not getting along. This is a very important value of teaching social studies. It is the study of people, how they interact, and how connections are formed.

    Classroom Application:
    I think this article would be awesome to share in a classroom!! It really can teach students how important it is to accept one another and that our differences should not be looked at in a negative way. As a class we can also talk about what happens when people choose not to accept one another for their differences. Teaching students this and having an open discussion of treating others with respect will affect them and how they view all their relationships!

    Weekly question: Examining bias and perspective
    This article is written from the perspective of these two girls, Katuka from India and Aslam from Pakistan. There is a preface to the two girls' perspective from the writer who tells the background of why the two countries are enemies. The writer mainly focused on the girls story; how they met and how they grew to be friends regardless of their background and differences. I wonder how big of problem it is really is between people of that country. I would be interested to hear more of the history and how extreme this problem has really been for these two countries. I thought it was funny how the girls religion teacher joked how this was one of the only times you would see India so close to Pakistan!

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  16. New York Times/ September 30th
    New York City's Internet Site Gets a User-Friendly Update
    By: Vivian Yee

    Summary: Mayor Michael Bloomberg of New York has spent a large proportion of his three terms leading New York into the internet age. He has supported the development of several apps including ones designed for "finding public bathrooms and avoiding dangerous bike routes". Furthermore, visitors of the website NYC.gov can file complaints online and view announcements. While creating this website has presented several challenges and a need for redesign, the mayor feels this is essential in a smartphone age. The city's chief digital officer, Rachel Haot, described it as "the face of the City of New York".

    Connections to social studies: This article relates to the NCSS theme of Science, Technology, and Society. It emphasizes how technology changes how people interact with the world. It brings up the question of how technology influences our cultures. This also relates to Power, Authority, and Governance. It causes the reader to examine the role and functions of government.

    Topic of the week: This story is written by someone who is an advocate of the mayor’s actions. The article only contains quotes from citizens and leaders who are supportive of the mayor. While there are most likely citizens who disagree with the substantial amount of time put into this project, their perspective is missing. They might say that the time put into this project could have been better used for more important issues.

    Applications: The definition of social studies, as found in the readings, suggests that its purpose is to promote civic competence. Skills/verbs found in the core include examine, identify, recognize, investigate, and compare and contrast. In order to become informed citizens, students must understand that articles are written from various perspectives. In the classroom, students should have opportunities to learn how to gather reliable information and recognize that it is written from a particular perspective. Providing newspapers for the class to review articles will make this concept more meaningful and relevant.

    Kara Weathers

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    Replies
    1. It's amazing how much technology provides conveniences in modern life. Sometimes I worry that these conveniences will turn into necessities. If they do, it's important to integrate this technology into our classrooms so our students will be able to survive.

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    2. It's amazing how much technology provides conveniences in modern life. Sometimes I worry that these conveniences will turn into necessities. If they do, it's important to integrate this technology into our classrooms so our students will be able to survive.

      Delete